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Another hip implant has been recalled. Stryker Orthopaedics has recalled two brands of its devices, as reported here. Unlike previous recalls by DePuy which were of the metal-on-metal implant contact surfaces, consisting of a metal ball and a metal hip socket, the Stryker recall is of femur stem implants.

Post-implant complications indicate that the Rejuvenate and ABG II modular-neck systems are experiencing fretting and corrosion at the modular neck junction. This corrosion and fretting appears to be leading to the same kind of patient reactions as the metal-on-metal head implants.

It would appear that patients may expect to encounter metalosis, pseudo tumors, aseptic loosening and other problems.

If you or a loved one have Stryker implant and have experienced any problems, please call our office at 314-721-8833.

At least one person has died and dozens were injured when a beer garden tent collapsed in a storm Saturday afternoon, reports the St. Louis Post Dispatch.

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A line of strong storms passed through St. Louis just before 4pm. Kilroy’s bar, south of Busch Stadium at 720 South Seventh Avenue had set up the tent as a beer garden. Reports indicate that the tent was permitted and inspected, but the investigation continues.

If you or a loved one was injured in this incident, please call or contact us at hendricksonlaw.com to discuss possible claims.

If your lovely Aunt Shelby give you a ShoulderFlex massager for Christmas … well, you don’t even want to re-gift this thing. And whatever you do, don’t use it!

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The ShoulderFlex massager by now bankrupt King International was recalled in August. NPR reports that the FDA recalled the device because clothing, hair and jewelry can get tangled in the device’s rotating parts. There were reports of one person being strangled by the massager and at least one other near-death by strangulation.

Before the recall process could be completed, King International went into bankruptcy. The toll-free recall number has been disconnected. Many consumers who purchased the product may not have been advised of the recall.

If you own one, take it back to the store where you purchased it. After all, you don’t want to end up on one of those “news of the weird” shows.

Happy Holidays!

The New York Times is reporting on a phenomenon they are calling distracted doctoring: concentrating on a computer or smartphone rather than the patient. And the risks to patients are tremendous.

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The article notes instances such as doctors making personal phone calls during operations, technicians monitoring bypass procedures texting and operating room nurses checking their phones for air fares. Obviously, if they aren’t concentrating on the patient, the patient is at risk. One physician quoted in the story refers to the smartphone or tablet computer as “iPatient.” The iPatient is getting all the attention instead of the real patient.

Smartphones and tablet computers are wonderful technology devices that give doctors and nurses access to a patient’s extensive medical records and virtually unlimited reference materials. However, the fact that the same devices can be used to surf the web, text and access Facebook, puts an area of distraction readily available, when the health care giver should be concentrating on the patient.

Like electronic medical records, smart devices are tools. Unfortunately, they can, and will, be abused.

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The innocuous “instant soup” cups. You know what I’m talking about. The dry soup mixes that come in a cup and you simply add boiling water, let stand for a minute or two and “voila”–instant soup. This seemingly simple product is masking a very real danger.

Physicians and nurses manning burn centers throughout the country know all too well the dangers, as reported by NPR in its story “Why Burn Doctors Hate Instant Soup.”

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Multiple times each week, burn centers across the country receive patients suffering burns caused by instant soup. And the doctors agree–the packaging of the product is simply defective. The cups are lightweight and tapered to a smaller bottom and thus are easily tipped over, sending scalding contents spilling onto people, causing severe burns on the arms, chests and laps. And because noodles retain the heat longer, they can actually cause worse burns.

The answer is simple, say the doctors: redesign the package into a bowl like configuration that is not as susceptible to tipping over.

If you or someone you know has been injured as a result of a defective product, please contact Todd N. Hendrickson at HendricksonLaw.com. for a free consultation.

Medtronic medication pumps are widely used to deliver pain medication, anti-spasm medication and other prescriptions directly into the spinal cord. And the FDA has determined that these pumps can cause serious harm. The FDA has issued a Class 1 recall.

The SynchroMed II implantable pumps, models 8637-20 and 8637-40 are the subject of the recall which has been reported here. A Class 1 recall means that these pumps have a reasonable probability of causing serious adverse health consequences or death. The pumps are failing, apparently due to a defective design relating to the battery.

These pumps are surgically implanted under the skin with delivery tubes placed to the point of delivery. Medtronic is not recommending that the pumps be removed and replaced at this point, says MedPage Today.

If you or a loved one has experienced a failure related to one of these pain pumps, or if you have one of these pumps implanted, you should contact our office to discuss your legal rights. Contact us at 314-721-8833 or at www.stlmedicalmalpractice.com.

The New York Times is reporting, what we already know–the number of complaints about metal-on-metal hip implants is surging. And there is no end in sight.

“All-metal replacement hips are on a trajectory to become the biggest and most costly medical implant problem since Medtronic recalled a widely used heart device” in 2007. At the present time, the major problems appear to exist be with the Zimmer Durom and DePuy (Johnson & Johnson) ASR metal-on-metal hip implants. But complaints are surfacing with many brands.

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Patients are experiencing reactions, believed to be linked to the shedding of metal debris. Unlike traditional hip implants that use a ceramic or metal ball and a poly-vinyl pelvic cup liner, the metal-on-metal components have metal balls and metal cups. Reactions to the metal debris mimmick severe infections and can attack and destroy bone and soft tissue. In the simplest cases, the metalosis causes the components to loosen and after surgical revision, the patients are recovering normal function after revision. However, in some cases, the metalosis has destroyed so much muscle bone and ligament, that normal revision is not possible. These patients can suffer debilitating pain and loss of function.

If you or a loved one has had a metal-on-metal hip implant, you should immediately consult with an attorney. Please contact Todd N. Hendrickson at stlmedicalmalpractice.com.

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Target has issued a recall on certain models of its Circo and Do Your Room brand step stools. These step stools with built in storage were sold for $25 to $30 between 2007 and 2010.

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Bloomberg News reports that there have been 27 reports of the stools breaking or collapsing and 14 reports of injuries.

If you have been injured as a result of the Target Circo and Do Your Room brand step stools or any other defective product, call or contact Todd N. Hendrickson and Hendrickson Law for a free consultation. You may be entitled to compensation for your injuries.

Have you or a family member contracted a serious infection following a procedure at a hospital or doctor’s office that involved prepping the site with an alcohol wipe? If so, you may have a legal case against the manufacturer of the wipe.

A truly massive recakk of Triad Alcohol Prep Pads has been issued. The original recall in January 2011 was rather limited, however, as months have gone by, the recall has grown. Triad Alcohol Prep Pads, Alcohol Swabs can be identified by the manufacturer Triad Group. They have also manufactured these products for sale by companies such as Walgreens, CVS, Smith & Nephew, GlaxoSmithKline, Eli Lilly and others. These products may be contained in various “kits” used by nurses and doctors, such as IV prep, blood draw and procedure kits.

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The Triad products were contaminated with Bacilus cereus, a bacteria that is normally soil dwelling. Normal symptoms of Bacilus cereus infection would include diarrhea, nausea and vomiting. At least one death has been linked to these contaminated products.

If you suspect that you or a family member was infected with Bacilus cereuas and you suspect it was caused by use of a contaminated alcohol prep, please contact the Law Offices of Todd N. Hendrickson, P.C. at www.hendricksonlaw.com.

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The New York Times is reporting that doctors are finding that “metal on metal” hip implants are failing at a much higher and faster rate than expected, leading to the need for early revision and replacement.“Metal on metal” refers to the materials used in the design. A typical hip implant consists of a femoral stem which is fixed into the femur or thigh bone. The hip socket (or acetabulum) is replaced with a “cup” of one design or another. A ball device is attached to the end of the femoral stem and fits into the acetabulur component, completing the ball and socket joint. Until about 10 years ago either the ball or the liner of the acetabulm was made of either ceramic or a poly plastic. Beginning in the late ’90s manufacturers began replacing either the ball or the cup or both with metal components. The theory was that the patient would achieve a longer life thus avoiding revision surgery to replace either the ball or the cup or both. The older ceramic and poly components had typical lifespans of 15 to 20 years.The theory is apparently proving to be false. As the is reporting, these metal on metal implants are failing much sooner than expected, some in as little as two years. What is occurring is the wear of the components is creating metal debris which is destroying soft tissue and bone. The estimate now is that 1 to 3% of implants are failing at this rate. However, since the metal on metal didn’t reach the peak of their popularity until 5 years or so ago, the real extent of the problem is still unknown. Given that 80,000 or more of these implants are used in primary replacements a year, that could be anywhere form 8,000 to 24,000 patients affected each year. Given that the typical hip replacement procedure can cost anywhere from $20,000 to $30,000 and lead to additional lost income and other losses, the financial impact on patients is potentially extensive.If you have experienced an early component failure, either due to pain or component loosening, or have had your hip implant revised for other reasons earlier than expected, you may want to consider a product liability action against the implant manufacturer. If you would like to explore this further, please feel free to contact me, attorney Todd N. Hendrickson. Although my practice is concentrated in Missouri and Illinois, I will consider appropriate cases throughout the United States. I have extensive experience and expertise in medical malpractice and medical product liability litigation, with particular emphasis in orthopeadic matters, including hip, knee and shoulder replacements. I have successfully litigated cases against hip implant manufactures for a variety of matters and I am uniquely qualified to review these types of cases.