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Johnson & Johnson and its division, DePuy Orthopedics, was hit with a $498 million dollar verdict today in federal court in Dallas Texas, for its defective Pinnacle hip implant. The case involved 5 plaintiffs, all Texas residents, who were implanted with the Pinnacle metal-on-metal hip device.

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Verdict was for approximately $130 million in compensatory damages and almost $360 million in punitive damages.

The trial team was led by Mark Lanier. Our office has been happy to place a small roll in this case and continues to accept additional victims of this truly awful product.

For a consult, please call.

How much is something going to cost? Always a fair question and almost always one that can be answered before you purchase anything. But when you are talking about medical procedures, particularly things like hip and knee replacements, you may not be able to find out.

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NPR, reporting on a study by Health Affairs, shows that the vast majority if orthopedic surgeons have no idea how much the implant they are using ends up costing the patient. Only 21% of them were able to accurately estimate the cost of the implants (accurate being within 20% of the actual cost).

That is really an astounding finding. Patients are consumers of medical services and should expect and demand transparency in pricing. Of course you can’t predict the final cost of any procedure because complications occur, but the base cost of the procedure should be transparent.

One problem? As NPR report, the costs of implants are often negotiated by the hospitals. Thus the same implant can be wildly different prices depending upon where the procedure is performed.

Bottom line: patients need to demand transparency in pricing.

The DaVinci robotic surgery system by Intuitive Surgical, Inc. is a high tech, 3D “robot” remotely operated by a surgeon. The DaVinci system is the hottest new product, touted by Intuitive and the hospitals it sells the system to as the greatest thing since the invention of the scalpel. They promise more precision, faster recovery and other benefits. But is it all that? Reality is substantially at odds with the marketing hype.

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The DaVinci robot is, at its core, simply another way to perform laparoscopic surgery. Laparoscopic minimally invasive surgery has been around for 20+ years and is utilized in many common surgical procedures: gallbladder, hysterectomy, prostatectomy, hernia and many others. Laparoscopic surgery is performed by a surgeon who places ports into the abdomen and insufflates the abdominal cavity with gas to allow for room to insert and manipulate surgical instruments through the ports. A camera and light are inserted through one port, so that the surgeon can see inside the patient on a video monitor. The surgeon directly manipulates the instruments through the portals. For more on laparoscopic surgery, see this article in Wikapdia.

The DaVinci system differs in that the surgeon’s direct contact with the instruments is severed. Traditional portals are placed, but then instruments and camera are inserted and these are attached to the DaVinci robot system. The surgeon, although still in the same OR room, sits at a remote console and operates the instruments via joystick-like controllers. An easy way to visualize it is to say it is like he is playing a video game. Except in this case, he doesn’t get to simply start over if a problem arises.

Intuitive has saturated the market with the DaVinci robot, by hyping the purported advantages of the system. They claim that the robotic system allows the surgeon an unprecedented 3D view inside the patient, as opposed to the 2D view of traditional laparoscopy. They assert that the system allows for the surgeon to make minutely accurate motions, because he or she can move their hands in the controls but have that translate to only millimeter movements inside the patient. It all sounds great. But the reality is not quite equal to the hype.

Reports have indicated problems with the robotic arms moving independently, causing internal injuries. Reports exist that the electric cautery instruments used in parts of certain procedures are sending electrical arcs out and causing burn injuries to adjacent organs or even causing remote injuries to organs far removed from the surgical location due to improper grounding. There have been reports of the system simply freezing during a procedure.

Even more frightening are the indications that hospitals are allowing surgeons to utilize the DaVinci with very little training and very little supervision. Any time a new surgical technique or tool is introduced, the surgeon and the hospital have a responsibility to make sure the surgeon has adequate training. Some sources indicate that a surgeon may require 100 or more surgeries before he is technically competent with the DaVinci. However, hospitals are not requiring anything like 100 supervised surgeries before turning the surgeon loose to fly solo on the DaVinci. In fact, some are requiring little more that a weekend training session.

Suffice it to say, that we anticipate significant malpractice claims arising out of the use of DaVinci robotic surgery systems. Product liability claims against Intuitive may be warranted in some cases. But even more likely are cases against the surgeons and the hospitals for malpractice, failure to advise the patients of the surgeon’s lack of experience, inadequate training of support staff and many other issues.

If you or a loved one has experienced injuries in connection with a DaVinci robotic surgical procedure, please contact our office for a consultation. Only an experienced medical malpractice attorney can tell you whether or not you have a case.

Johnson & Johnson hit with $8.3 million dollar verdict in the first case to go to trial over the defective Depuy ASR hip implants, reports Bloomberg.

The verdict was for more than the $5.3 million in compensatory damages requested by plaintiff, but did not include any punitive damages. Apparently the issue of punitive damages was hotly debated by jurors. The jury deliberated for five days.

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A New Jersey Jury has awarded a South Dakota woman $3.35 million dollars in the first vaginal mesh case to go to trial against Johnson & Johnson regarding the Ethicon mesh, reports Reuters.

As reported by the New York Times, Johnson & Johnson/DePuy was aware of massive failures of its ASR metal-on-metal hip replacement system by 2011.

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This information is coming from internal J&J documents as part of a trial expected to begin to today in Los Angeles. The internal analysis showed that nearly 40% of the ASR hips failed within five years of implant. The analysis also suggests that the implant is likely to fail prematurely in thousands of more patients in the next few years. Those patients will have to undergo costly and pain revision surgery.

If you or a loved one have a DePuy ASR hip implant, please call us at 1-800-557-8176 or contact us through our website at hendricksonlaw.com. You may be entitled to a substantial damages award.

For more information on the DePuy implants, see here, here and here.

Many hospitals, and surgeons, are touting the benefits of their latest piece of technology–the DaVinci Robotic Surgery System.  This new piece of high technology allows the surgeon to sit at a video game-like console to perform many types of surgery.   Instead of performing minimally invasive surgery using  now time-tested techniques of laparoscopic surgery, surgeons are opting for the DaVinci system.  The claimed benefits are that the procedure is less invasive, has fewer complications, less pain and promises a quicker return to normal activities–all the same benefits derived from laparoscopic techniques compared to “traditional” techniques.  However, it is becoming clear that patients may be experiencing a myriad of complications as a result of the DaVinci Robotic Surgery system.

So how do the three surgery types differ?  In traditional “open” surgery the surgeon makes an incision and actually places his hands and instruments directly into the patient.  The benefits are that the surgeon has a normal view and can manipulate organs and structures directly with his hands.  The surgeon has tactile and other sensory feedback.  Most surgeons are taught that when they encounter complications using any other type of procedure, they can and should convert to an “open” procedure for the remainder of the surgery.  In fact, almost every consent form for either laparoscopic or robotic surgery will include permission to convert to an open procedure if needed.

The gold-standard for many surgical procedure in the last twenty years has been laparoscopy.  In laparoscopy, the surgeon makes several small incisions and uses these incisions to insert a camera and instruments into the patient to perform the procedure.  The surgeon directly manipulates the instruments but views what is going on in the patient on a video monitor.  Almost every surgeon practicing today was either directly trained in laparoscopy or has been performing laparoscopy for many years.  The benefits of laparoscopy are less pain and a quicker return to normal activities.

And now there is the DaVinci Robotic Surgery System, which takes laparoscopy to a whole new level.  The same types of small incisions are made in order to insert a camera and instruments.  However, once the instruments are placed, the surgeon does not hold them in his or her hands.  Rather, the instruments are attached to a robotic surgery platform and the surgeon sits at a video console and manipulates the instruments using video game-like controllers.  The alleged benefit of this system is that it allows the surgeon to make much more precise and controlled maneuvers, such that a 1/2 inch movement of the controller may equate to a 1mm movement of the instrument in the patient.  The concept sounds wonderful.  However, in practice, problems appear to have arisen.

DaVinci Robotic Surgery systems have been used for abdominal surgeries such as gallbladder remove, for gynecological procedures such as hysterectomies and for other procedures such as prostatectomies.  They are even being used for endoscopic procedures.

However, patients have experienced complications such as bladder and bowel perforations, injuries to the ureter and rectum, and burns and other complications.  One suspected problem is that the DaVinci system utilizes an electronic scalpel, called a cautery, to make cuts.  The makers of the DaVinci system, Intuitive Surgery, Inc., a California company, used a monopolar system rather than a bi-polar system to ground the electrical current.  It appears that this less expensive system allows the current used to make cuts to jump to places unintended by the surgeon, sometimes far remote from the spot where the surgery is occurring.

Complications such as bowel and bladder perforations and other injuries can be life-threatening.  Serious injuries or death can occur if these complications are not promptly recognized and treated.

If you or a loved one have been injured during a DaVinci Robotic Surgery, please contact T

Johnson & Johnson’s DePuy division may be facing more than $3 billion in damages for its ASR and Pinnacle metal-on-metal hip implants, reports Reuters. Not a surprise to those of us involved in the metal-on-metal implant litigation.

DePuy recalled the ASR metal-on-metal implant in 2010, years after evidence in Europe and Australia showed that these implants were being revised at a rate drastically hirer than traditional ceramic or poly implants. DePuy was forced to recall its ASR implants here in the U.S. after it became clear that a significant percentage of patients with these implants were experiencing metal debris reaction, which included pseudo tumors, infection-like reactions, loss of bone and muscle due to metallosis, early loosening and early failure.

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Shortly after the ASR was recalled, it became clear to many that DePuy’s Pinnacle line was having similar problems. As calls poured in to attorneys around the country regarding the recalled ASR, a significant percentage of the calls were for DePuy Pinnacle implants with nearly identical problems.

Multi-district litigation cases are on-going for both the ASR and Pinnacle implants. MDL cases are contemplated regarding other metal-on-metal implants from other manufacturers. In recent weeks, Stryker has issued a recall on its modular stem system, the first non-bearing surface recall. (The DePuy and Pinnacle cases involve the weight-bearing implant surfaces, namely the artificial ball and cup joint that replaces the natural hip mechanism–Stryker’s implant is a modular femoral stem system that appears to be causing similar reactions as the bearing surface metal-on-metal implants, but due to corrosion at the connection of the modular components, rather than wear due to use of the bearing surfaces.) You can read about the Stryker recall here.

It is clear that there is trouble brewing for many, if not all, metal-on-metal hip implants. If you have experienced any of the following problems as a result of your metal-on-metal implant, please call our office at 1-800-557-8176:
Early Revision
Loosening
Pseudotumor
Metallosis
Implant Failure
Loss of Surrounding Muscle
Continuing Pain

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Another hip implant has been recalled. Stryker Orthopaedics has recalled two brands of its devices, as reported here. Unlike previous recalls by DePuy which were of the metal-on-metal implant contact surfaces, consisting of a metal ball and a metal hip socket, the Stryker recall is of femur stem implants.

Post-implant complications indicate that the Rejuvenate and ABG II modular-neck systems are experiencing fretting and corrosion at the modular neck junction. This corrosion and fretting appears to be leading to the same kind of patient reactions as the metal-on-metal head implants.

It would appear that patients may expect to encounter metalosis, pseudo tumors, aseptic loosening and other problems.

If you or a loved one have Stryker implant and have experienced any problems, please call our office at 314-721-8833.

Almost 100,000 patients have received the DePuy ASR, metal-on-metal hip implant system. Those implants are failing at an alarming rate, at least 13% in the first few years. That is far beyond any “normal” failure rate. As a result, DePuy, a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson, has recalled these hips.

The problem is, you can’t easily “recall” medical devices that have been implanted. That means they have to be explanted, or surgically removed and replaced. In the case of hip implants, this is called a revision, and it can be an expensive and painful operation.

If you have a DePuy ASR metal-on-metal hip implant, and you talk to your doctor about a hip revision, please talk to an attorney before you have the surgery. Reports are appearing around the country of hospitals treating these explanted hip components as medical waste and discarding them. Don’t let them do this to you! The removed implant is vital evidence. Just because the hip has been recalled doesn’t mean that you will automatically win a case against DePuy. You will still have to prove that the implant was defective in some way and the implant itself is the best evidence.

Please contact our office you have had a DePuy hip implant and need to discuss your legal rights.